K8s

Sergey Nuzhdin

7 minute read

How to deploy multi-arch Kubernetes cluster using Kubespray I recently bought 3 ODROID-HC1 devices to add a dedicated storage cluster to my home Kubernetes. I thought that it’s a good excuse to spend some time redeploying the cluster. Usually, I would’ve gone with CoreOS, since I’m a big fan of their immutable OS. Unfortunately, that is not an option if you have ARM nodes. So I had to choose between manual provisioning and Ansible.

Home Lab Infrastructure Overview

Overview of the infrastructure in my home lab

Sergey Nuzhdin

2 minute read

Home Lab Infrastructure Overview Every software or technology I blog about usually goes through my home lab first. A lot of people usually got surprised when they first hear that I have a multi-node Kubernetes cluster at home. It usually takes some time to tell them about all the machines and networking. Of course, not accounting for the time spent answering the question “why do you need it”. I added a few new devices and reconfigured everything from scratch recently.

Sergey Nuzhdin

7 minute read

A few days ago when I tried to install helm chart in my Kubernetes cluster I noticed that all new pods that required storage were in pending state. After a quick check of the logs, I found out that pods were unable to get PVC from GlusterFS. I recently wrote about my experience deploying GlusterFS cluster. This time I will go through recovering data from the broken GlusterFS cluster, and some problems I faced deploying new cluster.

Sergey Nuzhdin

5 minute read

Since my previous posts[1][2] about CI/CD, a lot have changed. I started using Helm for packaging applications, stopped using docker-in-docker in gitlab-runner. Recently, I started working on a few Golang microservices. I decided to try gitlab’s caching and split the job into multiple steps for better feedback in UI. Few of the main changes to my .gitlab-ci.yaml file since my previous post: no docker-in-docker using cache for packages instead of a prebuilt image with dependencies splitting everything into multiple steps.

Sergey Nuzhdin

5 minute read

Creating a high available PostgreSQL cluster always was a tricky task. Doing it in the cloud environment is especially difficult. I found at least 3 projects trying to provide HA PostgreSQL solutions for Kubernetes. Patroni Patroni is a template for you to create your own customized, high-availability solution using Python and - for maximum accessibility - a distributed configuration store like ZooKeeper, etcd or Consul. Database engineers, DBAs, DevOps engineers, and SREs who are looking to quickly deploy HA PostgreSQL in the datacenter - or anywhere else - will hopefully find it useful.